Tag Archives: multiracial

Diversity! What does it mean to you?

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Hello World Wide Web.  As I dream about a conversation; one that can entertain the uniqueness of the growing individual.  The one that is not defined by a race box, or cultural description.  Single and Pluralistic in form, I keep dealing with this pretty little word called “DIVERSITY”   I just ask what does it mean to you?  When you hear someone say, they teach or practice diversity.  I even saw a quote that said, “Diversity is not a choice, and inclusion is??” Really? Then why is there always a fight on the adult playground?  It’s amazing, that laws change, and then the expectation of, “go now, and everybody play nice” means that someone is actually being diverse.  When we’re young we go to school; make friends, even develop crushes.  Sometimes they don’t look just like us.  I remember my first crush.  He certainly didn’t look like me but I thought he was dreamy!  We talked in school, hung out….at school, and then went home to separate worlds that would never cross.  Did that make us diverse?  How do you get there?  We have all these divided islands and no bridges.  That’s the vision I have most times when I hear somebody talking about bringing people totally different together.  Where’s the bridge?  The relationship?  It takes more than a conversation to consider ourselves diverse.  It’s listening while the person speaks in passion of what you may not agree with and vowing not to change them.  Accepting their individuality. Interracial relationships; people who don’t fit perfectly into “the norm”  Do we have it?  Can we pass societal norms?   I’d like to know what you think.  Chime in below.  Do you have an idea or a vision to affect diversity?  The world needs you!  The safety of the adult playground depends on it!

Thanks for stopping by.  The conversation is going to start on Twitter and I would enjoy the thoughts of open minds and hearts @wecheckother.  Don’t forget to like the facebook page.

XOXOXO,

Others’Mother

A Letter from a Black Mother! Dear World…

Good Afternoon World Wide Web!  I want to share a letter.  This letter could be written by any mother with some of the same questions that this letter addresses.  It will pose some major questions and spark discussion.

Dear World,

I have a few questions.  It’s one that may or may not take very long to answer depending upon your views of the world that we share.  I’m preparing my son to become a productive member of our society and I would like to know what your reaction to the love of my life will be after I add all the love, support, lessons, and self-esteem I can to him at home.   In my home he enjoys a very rich experience of having multiple languages and cultures in his everyday interactions.  After I release him to you, your views, rejection, or opinions could reverse everything that I’ve placed my life into building up.  If I listen to the news, according to his melanin content that I adore, he will be profiled and have to walk in fear of being jailed because the statistics aren’t in his favor.  I love my baby.  There is nothing that I wouldn’t do to make sure that he can have every opportunity that the world could offer him.  I’m his mother!  My son is Hispanic and Black.  I know that the statistics actually aren’t in his favor on either side.  My letter represents so many who have a relationship with someone different from themselves.  We could even imagine that my son was Black and White (Non-Hispanic)  No matter the race, the question would be similar.

My afro isn’t exactly the pillar of beauty in the Latino community.  I watch television in Spanish and I can count on one hand the number of people who look like me or my baby on the collective of their broadcasts.  I fear for him because the love that he feels here at home could cause him to walk blindly into a place where he would not feel accepted.  That’s an issue for me.  When he looks at his father, who provides an un-bias love to him, I’m often reminded that everyone will not be so nice.

On the other hand, in the Black Community everyone with an ounce of black is accepted.  To be honest, in my community, once his or her hair follicle is opened and his or her skin is lightened, he becomes even more accepted.  I would go as far as to say, he becomes even more popular in my community because he or she is now, “light-skinned black”  I’ll admit this is something that if you aren’t apart of this group it may not be of importance to you.  It’s one that my race will continue to work on as time continues on.  So let me ask.

Does my son now forget his father because I’m a black woman?  As I prepare my son to be a “black” man, I often try and expect what you will reverse.   How do I protect my baby from the racism in the Latino community?  How do I prepare my son for the racism in America?  How do I help him properly nurture all of his identity?

A concerned “Black” Mother who Checks “Other” for her child

 

So there you have it.  Let me know what you think.  Thanks for stopping by.

Until the next,

Others’Mother

You’re NOT Black, White or Mixed Enough!!!

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Greatest Afternoon World Wide Web.  “Today is a GREAT day!  We are all closer to perfection today than we were yesterday!” -Marjorie Molina.  Today as the Carolina Blue Skies shower me with beautiful inspiration, I want to speak to you from my heart.  I own a multi-faceted vision.  My heart beats faster and my being becomes engaged while learning and participating in any conversation or function that encompasses race, culture, ethnicity, identity & diversity.  Honestly, the question that has been posed to me in my travels the most is, “You’re a black woman, why do you care about diversity?”  Really? It doesn’t help that I’m multi-lingual and I’m married to a Latino.  I’ve been written off as a “wanna-be” or not owning my “black.”  I seriously thought about calling L.L. Cool J.  We should collaborate.  I get it.  (I truly plan to) Chris Rock  gave his movie, “Good Hair”  So many have introduced this issue, that has soooo many levels.   I’ve had a few people say they were going to take my “black card”  I’m not “black enough.”  “Black Enough?”  Should I snap and roll my neck, speak improperly?  Maybe that would make you like me.  I should submit to stereotypes and help facilitate the progression of wounded social norms.  But the meat and potatoes is, “You’re NOT multiracial”  But…My children are.   My soul is wrapped around my two children.  I breathe to love them, and create a future for them that will allow their integration as productive adults into our society.  That has been my job since I gave birth and it will be my job until the day that I retire.  I see a gap in our current beliefs and understanding that leaves room for my children and children and adults like them to have questions about their identities. I am seeking to fill that gap.  Recently, in a conversation I had someone tell me I was promoting racial assimilation.  That I’m trying to “whitten the race.”  I could just let my children say they’re black, besides, the one drop rule would apply to make it true.    I could just call them “black” and let them have the privilege of being lighter skinned, and having “good hair.”  Here’s what I understand about multi-racial, cultural and ethnic identity.  It’s not about being “let into a club”  Can I check your box?  It’s not about that at all.  Instead it’s about, I’ve grown up in a house with two people who look differently, believe differently,  share different cultures etc, and personally, I don’t want either of “your boxes.”  I am a unique individual beyond the threshold of your post 1776 German doctor views.”  This is what I get most times I meet someone who is “mixed”  There are some who say, “I am mixed”, “I really don’t know how to answer that question” or they solely identify with one over the other.”

The German medical scientist Johann Blumenbach, whose 1776 book, “On the Natural Varieties of Mankind,” established the five-race model we know  today: “Caucasian, Mongolian (Asian), Malay (Pacific Islanders), American Indian and Negro.”

Their parents go through hell trying to exist in a world of turmoil and petty quarrels over their varying existences together. The movements of interracial acceptance didn’t began in the U.S. until the 1960’s and trickled to a post confederate south that never truly opened up to the understanding until later in the 1970’s.    Imagine that it wasn’t until the year 2000 that people of mixed race were able to check more than one box on the U.S. Census.

I am a Mother!  I was born to change my future, my children’s & anywhere that my arms can reach.  I know that’s what I was born to do.

Thank you so much for tuning in.  As always if you would like to reach me; my email is always open.  I’m always looking to connect with like minds.  email me at DiverCityInc@hotmail.com.  I’m on Twitter @MarjorieIam  @wecheckother.   Make your day GREAT!

XOXOXO,

Others’Mother