Tag Archives: Mixed Children

50 Years Later

Banning-Interracial-Marriage

 

 

Good Morning World Wide Web!  Today in the United States the waves of telecommunications are ignited with the commemoration of a milestone.  One that took place 50 years ago.  That milestone was the peak of a movement called the Civil Rights Movement.  There was a march on the U.S. capital led by several Civil Rights activists.  The activist most famous to Americans is Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.  Dr. King delivered the famous “I have a Dream” speech 8/28/1963.  The goal of this movement was to make sure that the rights of all people were equally protected by the law, including the rights of minorities.   There were movements that took place around the world that were similar.

The Independence Movements in Africa, Canada’s Quiet Revolution, The North Ireland civil rights movement, The Chicano Movement, The American Indian movement, German Students Movement, France, and so many others.  Simultaneously, there were movements going on around the world.  They all fought for equality in the eyes of the law for whatever the subject or issue was.

Someone recently told me that we can’t understand the future unless we understand our history.  Knowing where we come from is essential to gaining traction in where we are going as people in our world.  Continuing to progress is based on understanding what we are building upon.  Unless people are going to break up and fall out of love, or there are going to be groups of melanin content to just disappear, diversity is going to become one of the single most important elements of our existence.  Changes that will challenge our current understanding and force many outside of their comfort zones.

50 years later, we’ve had laws continue and some reversed.  We’ve seen things change and some that have stayed the same.  The ones that are important to all of us are unique.  Dr. King’s “I have a dream speech” allowed him to open his heart wide when he imagined the 4 most important people to him; his children;  having a life that he could have only dreamed about at that time.  He poured his heart into his words, and people with similar dreams followed, and marched; peacefully.

The Racial Integrity Act of 1924 prohibited the marriage of people classified as “white” and people classified as “colored.” On June 12, 1967 “Loving vs. Virginia” was a landmark civil rights case that invalidated laws prohibiting interracial marriage in the United States.  This landmark case was followed by an increase from that time in marriages of interracial couples.

Anti-Miscegenation-Laws-Map

 

 

Federal immigration and military policies also prevented interracial marriages.  After World War II , American soldiers were forbidden to marry “foreign” women.

A 2012 Study at UCLA showed unmarried same-sex couples and straight couples have higher rates of interracial relationships than married couples.  If you expand the scope of this information to couples that actually adopt children of different races then the numbers of interracial families are higher also.   The fact that interracial couples aren’t marrying shows that our society is still very far from being “post racial” or “colorblind.”  Often the element of couples can marry interracially is used to show that we live in a post racial society.  Do we truly live in a post racial society?  The box OTHER (referring to a race) other than what’s been available since the 1800’s didn’t become a part of the US Census until the year 2000.  This information along with recent activities, like a Cheerios commercial that ignited, support, fury and in some cases racial hatred to come to the surface, should encourage us to explore these factors that shape our understandings, and still limit interracial couples, biracial children and racial relations so that we can truly advance and become the diverse nation we were founded to be.

As Always, Thank you for your time and energy.  I appreciate your support!  Join the conversation on Twitter @wecheckother.  Until the Next,

Others’Mother

You’re NOT Black, White or Mixed Enough!!!

why

 

Greatest Afternoon World Wide Web.  “Today is a GREAT day!  We are all closer to perfection today than we were yesterday!” -Marjorie Molina.  Today as the Carolina Blue Skies shower me with beautiful inspiration, I want to speak to you from my heart.  I own a multi-faceted vision.  My heart beats faster and my being becomes engaged while learning and participating in any conversation or function that encompasses race, culture, ethnicity, identity & diversity.  Honestly, the question that has been posed to me in my travels the most is, “You’re a black woman, why do you care about diversity?”  Really? It doesn’t help that I’m multi-lingual and I’m married to a Latino.  I’ve been written off as a “wanna-be” or not owning my “black.”  I seriously thought about calling L.L. Cool J.  We should collaborate.  I get it.  (I truly plan to) Chris Rock  gave his movie, “Good Hair”  So many have introduced this issue, that has soooo many levels.   I’ve had a few people say they were going to take my “black card”  I’m not “black enough.”  “Black Enough?”  Should I snap and roll my neck, speak improperly?  Maybe that would make you like me.  I should submit to stereotypes and help facilitate the progression of wounded social norms.  But the meat and potatoes is, “You’re NOT multiracial”  But…My children are.   My soul is wrapped around my two children.  I breathe to love them, and create a future for them that will allow their integration as productive adults into our society.  That has been my job since I gave birth and it will be my job until the day that I retire.  I see a gap in our current beliefs and understanding that leaves room for my children and children and adults like them to have questions about their identities. I am seeking to fill that gap.  Recently, in a conversation I had someone tell me I was promoting racial assimilation.  That I’m trying to “whitten the race.”  I could just let my children say they’re black, besides, the one drop rule would apply to make it true.    I could just call them “black” and let them have the privilege of being lighter skinned, and having “good hair.”  Here’s what I understand about multi-racial, cultural and ethnic identity.  It’s not about being “let into a club”  Can I check your box?  It’s not about that at all.  Instead it’s about, I’ve grown up in a house with two people who look differently, believe differently,  share different cultures etc, and personally, I don’t want either of “your boxes.”  I am a unique individual beyond the threshold of your post 1776 German doctor views.”  This is what I get most times I meet someone who is “mixed”  There are some who say, “I am mixed”, “I really don’t know how to answer that question” or they solely identify with one over the other.”

The German medical scientist Johann Blumenbach, whose 1776 book, “On the Natural Varieties of Mankind,” established the five-race model we know  today: “Caucasian, Mongolian (Asian), Malay (Pacific Islanders), American Indian and Negro.”

Their parents go through hell trying to exist in a world of turmoil and petty quarrels over their varying existences together. The movements of interracial acceptance didn’t began in the U.S. until the 1960’s and trickled to a post confederate south that never truly opened up to the understanding until later in the 1970’s.    Imagine that it wasn’t until the year 2000 that people of mixed race were able to check more than one box on the U.S. Census.

I am a Mother!  I was born to change my future, my children’s & anywhere that my arms can reach.  I know that’s what I was born to do.

Thank you so much for tuning in.  As always if you would like to reach me; my email is always open.  I’m always looking to connect with like minds.  email me at DiverCityInc@hotmail.com.  I’m on Twitter @MarjorieIam  @wecheckother.   Make your day GREAT!

XOXOXO,

Others’Mother

Let’s Talk Race?

alberteinstein

Greatest Afternoon World Wide Web.  Today is a beautiful day!  We are closer to perfection than we were yesterday.  I am going to spread my wings and type today.  Most of the time, there is this thought out idea, attempting to not step on any toes, offend, and omit bias.  I check once, twice and have my friends to proofread before pressing publish.   I have this vision of education,community and arts but there are days that I am just discouraged.    When I met my husband; we fell in love and our relationship has been an adventure.  We dated 2 years with a family language barrier for the 1st year.  I learn fast, so we were up and communicating in no time.  I even hopped on a plane and left the country to meet his family with all the broken Spanish that I could take with me.   I wondered what my friends would think.  How we would integrate our very different upbringing and beliefs?  We were married and our first child was born in 2007.  I wondered, “How would she be perceived?”  Even I wondered “What was her race?”  How would I describe my beautiful baby to the world?  Her name was a challenge; my in-laws don’t speak any English.  My mother doesn’t speak Spanish.  Now I have my children with their first name that my in-laws can’t pronounce, and their 2nd name, that my mother can’t.  Problem solved!  They call them by which name they can pronounce and everyone is happy.   Learning to live within and integrate this new existence that is as delicate as a feather.  I’ve had so many challenges and triumphs.  In certain parts of the world, this isn’t an important conversation.  There are plenty of major Metropolitan cities that are as diverse as a tropical paradise.  Unfortunately, there are so many more that are beyond that horizon that have not arrived yet.  There is not true respect and understanding for racial identities in so many places.  Stereotypes, racism and bias plague the futures of our diverse little pioneers who will go out into the world with multiple perspectives on cultures and race.  Why did my life have to touch on one of the super sensitive subjects?  You know the ones you’re never truly suppose to discuss without expecting an argument; religion, politics, race.  The most sensitive ones in the pack.   These subjects are all tied to culture.  With everything considered,  I know it’s where I’m suppose to be going.    It helps that I’ve always been the person that’s really hard to tell “be quiet” to.  I enjoy speech that is  relative to issues that I am passionate about.  Right now I am the director, founder, CEO, funder, fundraiser, grant research/writer at We Check Other.com/org.   Today I am PR /Outreach.  If you are interested in connecting, to partner with and or partnership opportunities you can reach out to me at letstalkrace@live.com.  Have an idea?  Are you a individual or organization with a passion for race, culture, diversity, multi- racial, cultural, ethnic issues, conversations, arts, research. etc? Sponsor?

If you have a general inquiry, you can always send your email to wecheckother@yahoo.com.  As always thank you for tuning in.  Your support is always welcome on facebook and twitter @wecheckother.  Until the Next!

XOXOXO,

Others’Mother

 

Multi-ALL Must READS

bookkids

 

 

 

kidsbook2

 

 

Good Afternoon World Wide Web!  Today is a wonderful day.  We are closer to perfection than we were yesterday!  I am sending out some great options for every person living, loving, raising children or just simply interested in diversity.  I’ve said this to so many people in my life; my children (2) are my greatest teachers.  Their actions, and minds allow me to attempt daily to better understand our world.  I’ve included two children’s books with great material that are wonderful to share with our children.  Please enjoy!

Please find @wecheckother on Facebook and Twitter!  Thank you!

Others’Mother

 

Black, White, Other

black white other

Good Evening World Wide Web!  Today is the greatest day!  We are closer to perfection than we were yesterday!  I’m going to begin by saying, “Happy Groundhog Day!”  Punxsutanwney Phil didn’t see his shadow.  Pennsylvania’s most famous groundhog has forecast an early spring.  Ok..so for anyone unfamiliar, there is a legend in the United States that if this furry rodent, or groundhog sees his shadow in a place called Gobblers Knob in Pennsylvania, winter will last 6 more weeks.  If he doesn’t then spring will come earlier.  There’s a ceremony and all conducted by the “Inner Circle.”  Well today, cameras rolling, and no shadow.  My flowers are ready!  I come offering a great read.  The book “Black, White, Other” has gotten some good reviews.    Enjoy!

 

I’m Chocolate, You’re Vanilla!

chocolate-vanilla

 

GREAT Afternoon World Wide Web!  Today is a great day!  We are closer to perfection than we were yesterday. Here’s a related read!  Enjoy!

I’m on facebook and twitter @wecheckother.  Join me!  Thank you for your time!  Happy Reading.

“Some OTHER RACE”

Census2010HispanicRace2-252x300

 

Great Evening World Wide Web.  Today is a great day!  We are all closer to perfection than we were yesterday.   As I searched the internet to find the real measure of how our Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census tracks our human population, I wanted to make sure that I could offer an actual example.  I want to begin by drawing your attention to question #8 that leads into #9.  This is important because Hispanics or Latinos are the nations largest minority group and growing.   I realize how important it may be to keep up with these growing statistics, but most people don’t.  I’ve heard, well, I’m not “Black” I’m African-American or vice versa.   There are Latinos who don’t know their race or races, if you ask them “What is your race?” They will proudly tell you Latino.  As I’ve reiterated, this is a cultural classification.  The problem is, MOST Latinos are “Mixed” or OTHER.  I would go as far as to say PLENTY of African-Americans or Blacks are also, but because of the history of this country, that dialogue is far off.    The thought processes behind the ideals that created and maintained the idea of racial segregation is why the Ethnicities are skewing the stats.  Here’s how I would answer these questions.   My children would check the box that say “OTHER” Latino origin,  Black, and American Indian.  That’s three boxes!!!  Alternatively, I may just CHECK THE BOX that says “SOME OTHER RACE” attempting to show my children are a mixture. A New Creation. Then I could attempt to explain by saying something like BLACK and LATINO or Blaxureno.  That’s a real head scratcher.  The problem with that answer is that one is a RACE and the OTHER is a culture.  My children are CULTURALLY AMERICAN.  I am an American, my mother, grandmother, and great-grandmother on both maternal and paternal sides were all born right here in America.  I married an immigrant, in the land of immigrants.  This is a growing dynamic in America.   Is melanin the issue? Precious cancer fighting, sun protecting melanin. (another blog)  What a way to skew some stats!  This is a sensitive yet important issue that we must work on….together.  This is a small lesson on how items are offered through our government.  You see, the results of these federal forms are used to decide civil rights laws, funding, & even redistricting of congressional districts.  Is it the form’s problem or do we need to add more boxes?  Will it stop the mixtures?  I really don’t think so unless we enact some older laws from the 1960s and 70s.   The problem is who I’m trying to tell you I am doesn’t fit our typical understanding anymore.   For this very reason the US Census Bureau is working to change some of the questions that we now use to track our current racial demographics.  Read more at the link below.

http://www.pewsocialtrends.org/2012/08/07/census-bureau-considers-changing-its-racehispanic-questions/

Is the answer to add more questions?  Is it just LATINOS who check other?  What about the people who prefer one racial name for a classification over another?  Could it be that PEOPLE have changed and don’t fit into our BLACK, WHITE, ASIAN rules?  Science says this is the base of all ethnicities and race.  Could it be race is completely evolving?  The “concept” that doesn’t exist, but we’ve all come to understand as our realities around the globe?  What do you think?  I would love to hear from you.  Share any comments or answers to these questions that you’d like.

As always, I appreciate your time.  I’d like to thank you for stopping by.  Please show your support by finding my Facebook and Twitter page @wecheckother.  LIKE the page to show your support.  I’m always looking for guest bloggers and people willing to share their stories.  Please contact me at wecheckother@yahoo.com.  Until the Next!

XOXOXO,

Others’Mother

BLACK, LATINO & “OTHER”

Good Afternoon World Wide Web!  Today is a great day!  We are closer to perfection than we were yesterday.  Indeed we are.  I want to begin by sharing a personal, true story.  This story is one of many that began to give shape to a reality that I truly lived and learned something that before this milestone I really didn’t understand the dynamics of its reality.  It took place about 5 years ago.  This is based on a real life event so I will skew names just to protect the persons involved.  After the birth of my daughter; I’ll call my daughter Kaitlyn. I was invited to a then long time friend of mine’s house who is Dominican.  For anyone not familiar I will place some definitions in this post to give you as much of a visual as possible.  Let me begin by saying that I am not trying to attack Dominican culture, I am only trying to bring awareness and speaking from a true personal experience.

I entered the gathering with my daughter “Kaitlyn in hand.  The music and food were awesome!  There was great reception among the people who knew that I identify as African-American and there were some who weren’t as open; which was o.k.  After about an hour or so of being there, I was comfronted by a woman, who identified as Dominican.  She asked me, “Who’s baby is that, that you have?”  I smiled and said, “This is my daughter Kaitlyn.”  The woman, I’ll call her Emma gasped,  “hhhhuuuuhhhh!”  She almost scared me.  “De verdad!” She replied to me in spanish.  This means, “For real?”  I replied,” yes she is.”   I looked at Emma almost confused because she knew very well that my husband was Mestizo and from Central America.  The disbelief was the beginning of my awareness.  I tried to soften the blow by beginning to mention my husband.  Emma says, “You still with the Mexican?”  I told her, “Well yes, but my husband is from Honduras”   Emma continues to dig the hole, “Well Mexico, Honduras; they’re the same thing!”  I gave a blank stare.  Emma; “Well how is it that your daughter looks like that?”  I reply to Emma, “What do you mean?”  She goes on to talk about her two daughters and how her grandmother was “white” and her husband’s grandmother had long hair like another guest.  I replied, “Well that’s nice.”  I have to admit, it took me a few moments for the light to turn on but then I realized, that after her series of questions, she really identified me in her mind as though my family had migrated from Africa yesterday.  I honestly looked at her, before becoming more mature and thought, “She’s “blacker” than me.”  What I’m saying is that Emma’s skin was much darker than mine.  If she didn’t open her mouth and speak Spanish I would consider her just another “black” woman.   I have to give you a visual so that you can better understand.  You see, Emma and her husband were Afro-Dominican.

Afro – Dominican is a Dominican of African descent. Most Africans arrived to the Dominican Republic came to this land from the sixteenth to the nineteenth century because of slavery. Most of them came from West and Central Africa. Currently there are also many black immigrants, particularly Haitians, which can be included within of the Afro-Dominican community, if they were born in the country or have Dominican naturalization. Afro-Dominicans are the majority in the country, being mainly mulattos. -Wikipedia

Emma and her family had beautiful rich melanin content, and her hair texture was what I would identify immediately as a “black” or “African-American” woman, and so was her husband and daughters.  My heritage is also pretty interesting, but I didn’t feel the need or thought it would be useful to go down my entire lineage so that she could understand my racial dynamics.  I thought, “Is she really asking me this?”  As I looked around the room I saw every “race” and mixture under the rainbow.  I got a crash course in that visit of the racial dynamics within the “LATINO community.  They also have a very common acceptance of “Other” or “mixed” children, because this was their reality.  “Other” or “mixed” children to them are typical to be Latino.  Just as long as the children came from 2 people who identified as Latino.  It is very similar if not worse to that of American culture, in my opinion.    I even mentioned the incident to my husband who wasn’t there with me and he said, “All Dominican’s are “black.”  Even my husband, whose appearance is that of a typical LATINO; “Indian” or “Mestizo” carried some similar racial bias.

I have to admit, I’ve heard the “she looks hispanic” or “she has indian in her blood” and the long list of others to try to explain race and cultural relations.  What I found in that visit was an unwillingness from a racially black, culturally Latino women-Emma that my Kaitlyn who has a typical look and mixture of a “mulatto” from her own country, simply because I identify was “African-American.”  This is also one of the long list of occurences that birthed in my heart the need for my children and others like mine to have their own identities and not be shoved in or out of a culture or race for an unwillingness to accept their uniqueness and symbolism of unity.

I imagine that this takes place in MOST ETHNICITIES.  Mainly because an ETHNICITY is not a RACE.  It just a group of RACES or RACIAL MIXTURES that celebrate a CULTURE.  I’ve included some definitions for anyone from the eastern hemispehere or just not particularly familiar with the countries I’m mentioning.

 

Dominicans (Spanish: Dominicanos) are people inhabiting or originating from Dominican Republic. The majority of Dominicans reside in Dominican Republic, although there is also a large Dominican diaspora, especially in the United States, Puerto Rico and Spain. The population of the Dominican Republic in 2007 was estimated by the United Nations at 9,760,000.[2]—                 -Wikipeidia

Racial issues

As elsewhere in the Spanish Empire, the Spanish colony of Hispaniola employed a social system known as casta, wherein Peninsulares (Spaniards born in Spain) occupied the highest echelon. These were followed, in descending order of status, by: criollos, castizos, mestizos, Indians, mulattoes, zambos, and black slaves.[9][10] The stigma of this stratification persisted, reaching its culmination in the Trujillo regime, as the dictator used racial persecution and nationalistic fervor against Haitians.

According to a study by the CUNY Dominican Studies Institute, about 90% of the contemporary Dominican population has West African ancestry to varying degrees.[11] However, most Dominicans do not self-identify as black, in contrast to people of West African ancestry in other countries. A variety of terms are used to represent a range of skintones, such as morena (brown), canela (red/brown; literally: “cinnamon”), India (Indian), blanca oscura (dark white), and trigueña (literally “wheat colored”, which is the English equivalent of olive skin),[12] among others.

Many have claimed that this represents a reluctance to self-identify with West African descent and the culture of the freed slaves. According to Dr. Miguel Anibal Perdomo, professor of Dominican Identity and Literature at Hunter College in New York City, “There was a sense of ‘deculturación’ among the West Indian slaves of Hispaniola. [There was] an attempt to erase any vestiges of West Indian culture from the Dominican Republic. We were, in some way, brainwashed and we’ve become westernized.”[13]

However, this view is not universal, as many also claim that Dominican culture is simply different and rejects the racial categorizations of other regions. Ramona Hernández, director of the Dominican Studies Institute at City College of New York asserts that the terms were originally a defense against racism: “During the Trujillo regime, people who were dark skinned were rejected, so they created their own mechanism to fight it.” She went on to explain, “When you ask, ‘What are you?’ they don’t give you the answer you want … saying we don’t want to deal with our blackness is simply what you want to hear.”[14] The Dominican Republic is not unique in this respect, either. In a 1976 census survey conducted in Brazil, respondents described their skin color in 136 distinct terms.[9][14]

-Wikipedia

As always, I sincerely appreciate your time and attendance.  If you can identify, live in, or love someone who checks “OTHER” or is outside of 1 box, please show your support my liking @wecheckother on facebook and twitter.   Thank you!  Until the next.

XOXOXO,

OthersMother

 

I’ll Create My Own Identity!

enterlove

Great Evening World Wide Web!  Today is a wonderful day.  We are closer to perfection today than we were yesterday.  On this very first Sunday in 2013 I want to blog about a subject that I think most people who are of multiple races, ethnicities & cultures have heard.  I wouldn’t say it’s right or wrong.  I think personally that it is all about the “user” and how comfortable they feel in creating their own personal identity.  I’m sure there are many feelings on how this subject should be approached.   I think all identity is personal even if you identify with a singular box.  I realize that it really doesn’t begin to touch the issues that so many of the people who are “mixed” heritiage or couples in interracial or intercultural relationships have to deal with, but again these are a personal choice.    We’ve all heard these terms or similar ones: blaxican, blasian, blatino, blacknamese, blacklaos, blackapino, Caurean, Casian, ChexMex, Chigro, Filitina, Japorican, Mexipino, and the list goes on and on.  The attempt to find a box for a child of direct “mixed” heritage, where a new name is created.   Could you imagine a census with soooo many choices?  I think the boxes would be the entire questionnaire.  I’m not trying in any way to make light of the subject, but I am trying to make a point.  Maybe there will never be a way to identify all the beautiful uniqueness that humanity has created.  I do think however that the simple box OTHER will began to let that light shine.  I know that OTHER is one box, but it’s the hippest, most inclusive, colorful box in the list.   Atleast that’s what I tell my two beautiful kids.  They have friends and loved ones who identify with just one and have pride in one.  My 5 year old has even began to be pitched into why she is just “one” race based on her melanin content.  (That’s another blog)   It simply means that you have the priviledge to explain instead of just robotically checking a box.  It’s kinking the “norm” to the curb, and redifining the integrations of LOVE and the beginning of understanding what is unique.  OTHER!  WE CHEK OTHER.  If you hadn’t become fully aqauinted with the idea of wecheckother.com,  I really hope this begins to explain why this blog is here.  I’m excited to hear from you and look forward to learning together.  Let me know what you think.  How should “mixed” race, culture and ethnicities identify themselves?  Until til the next.

XOXOXO,

Others’Mother

Happy New Year from WE CHECK OTHER!

new year

Happy New Year World Wide Web!  2013!  I would like to begin by extending a personal invite for each of the members, subscrbers, and viewers to follow on facebook, and twitter:  @wecheckother.   New content for this brand new year is on the way.

I look forward to working with and interacting with each of you in the future!  I forward blessings and prosperity through the World Wide Web  to each of you in this upcoming year ahead of us all!  Cheers to learning, growing, sharing, giving, loving, living, life, and happiness!

XOXOXO,

Others’Mother