Tag Archives: LGBT

50 Years Later

Banning-Interracial-Marriage

 

 

Good Morning World Wide Web!  Today in the United States the waves of telecommunications are ignited with the commemoration of a milestone.  One that took place 50 years ago.  That milestone was the peak of a movement called the Civil Rights Movement.  There was a march on the U.S. capital led by several Civil Rights activists.  The activist most famous to Americans is Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.  Dr. King delivered the famous “I have a Dream” speech 8/28/1963.  The goal of this movement was to make sure that the rights of all people were equally protected by the law, including the rights of minorities.   There were movements that took place around the world that were similar.

The Independence Movements in Africa, Canada’s Quiet Revolution, The North Ireland civil rights movement, The Chicano Movement, The American Indian movement, German Students Movement, France, and so many others.  Simultaneously, there were movements going on around the world.  They all fought for equality in the eyes of the law for whatever the subject or issue was.

Someone recently told me that we can’t understand the future unless we understand our history.  Knowing where we come from is essential to gaining traction in where we are going as people in our world.  Continuing to progress is based on understanding what we are building upon.  Unless people are going to break up and fall out of love, or there are going to be groups of melanin content to just disappear, diversity is going to become one of the single most important elements of our existence.  Changes that will challenge our current understanding and force many outside of their comfort zones.

50 years later, we’ve had laws continue and some reversed.  We’ve seen things change and some that have stayed the same.  The ones that are important to all of us are unique.  Dr. King’s “I have a dream speech” allowed him to open his heart wide when he imagined the 4 most important people to him; his children;  having a life that he could have only dreamed about at that time.  He poured his heart into his words, and people with similar dreams followed, and marched; peacefully.

The Racial Integrity Act of 1924 prohibited the marriage of people classified as “white” and people classified as “colored.” On June 12, 1967 “Loving vs. Virginia” was a landmark civil rights case that invalidated laws prohibiting interracial marriage in the United States.  This landmark case was followed by an increase from that time in marriages of interracial couples.

Anti-Miscegenation-Laws-Map

 

 

Federal immigration and military policies also prevented interracial marriages.  After World War II , American soldiers were forbidden to marry “foreign” women.

A 2012 Study at UCLA showed unmarried same-sex couples and straight couples have higher rates of interracial relationships than married couples.  If you expand the scope of this information to couples that actually adopt children of different races then the numbers of interracial families are higher also.   The fact that interracial couples aren’t marrying shows that our society is still very far from being “post racial” or “colorblind.”  Often the element of couples can marry interracially is used to show that we live in a post racial society.  Do we truly live in a post racial society?  The box OTHER (referring to a race) other than what’s been available since the 1800’s didn’t become a part of the US Census until the year 2000.  This information along with recent activities, like a Cheerios commercial that ignited, support, fury and in some cases racial hatred to come to the surface, should encourage us to explore these factors that shape our understandings, and still limit interracial couples, biracial children and racial relations so that we can truly advance and become the diverse nation we were founded to be.

As Always, Thank you for your time and energy.  I appreciate your support!  Join the conversation on Twitter @wecheckother.  Until the Next,

Others’Mother