Tag Archives: black in america

Are WE ALL BIAS? RACIST?

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“Greatest Evening to you World Wide Web.  Today is a beautiful day.  We are closer to perfection today than we were yesterday.”-Marjorie Molina   Today I am asking a question.  Are WE ALL BIAS!? RACIST!? Just plain don’t like that black guy who cut you off in traffic the other day.  He’s like all the other rapper thugs who want a hand-out from the government.  Or the Spanish guy who lives in a house with 3 families and has too many children waiting for his handout too. The Cauc-Asian serial killer.    I honestly tried to think of a negative bias for other races and ethnicities but I don’t have a long list.  I even asked 7 people and nothing.   The dynamics could be different around the world.  Whatever the numbers, I’m sure when one is honest in a closed circle, they’ve heard at least one negative association to a race or culture.  This post isn’t to help self conviction.  This is not even to blast a race or talk about the MANY negative associations to one or another.  I really just want to know how connected are we?  How diverse is our dinner tables?  Can we truly tackle the obstacles of another’s shoes if we haven’t walked in them?  How open are we to being totally wrong about what we think is right?  These are all questions that have to be asked of one self when we expect to overcome which ever diagnosis we may have.

Why am I asking this question?  Honestly,  I see too many inadequate attempts to tackle the issue.  Bias that people hold seeping into words.  The unwillingness to open the UN at their dinner table.  The lack of real life experiences sharing that this is not just a walk in the park where the answer magically appears.  Post racial integration which was oh just 30 or 40 years ago, people have started to openly accept well the integration of race.  We have ALL been influenced by the world in which we were bred.  Anyone who denies this fact is dangerous.  They aren’t truly dealing with an issue, they are denying there is a problem.   Can just 2 minorities tackle the issue?  My opinion, absolutely not.  Everyone needs a seat at the table even the majority.  A ticket to the open-minded.  People who are willing to be absolutely wrong, and right sometimes, to tackle an issues that are long overdue.  The willingness to let ego stand down and let the soul, LOVE and human logic take the vote.  The willingness to be open and allow your soul to be shaped in love.  Can we do this?  Who needs a seat?  I don’t want a seat.  I want to lead the project team.  I was born to do so.  My circle is a mini UN in progress.   I openly seek out each opportunity to shake the hand of someone who looks and speaks differently than me. What can I learn? How does that fit into the big picture?  So many questions that can be fit into one post.  The truth is the two biggest minorities aren’t the have all end all.  Black & Latino I mean.  “The beautiful burden of being the land free to the brave and home of the rich where opportunity is opened up to all that knock is the grand diversity of our issues”-Marjorie Molina

If you are a 1%er living tastefully diverse, I salute you!  I admire your resolve.  I have an idea of what your path of growth was and still is like and I would like to share that gift with the world someday.  The ability to funnel LOVE.  To see the world through open eyes in a world that is segregated still from everything to churches to the grocery store, we have work to do.  Every person alive and loving outside of the box is doing all of humanity a great service.  I salute you.

Thank you for your time.  Please share my work if you would like.  I LOVE fans!  I’m on facebook and twitter.  @wecheckother.  LIKES help me grow in my dream and as a writer.  Join me.  Let’s connect LIKE minds.  wecheckother@yahoo.com

I am a “FACTS HUNTER”  Below are some definitions for all who like to stand on concrete.  Enjoy!

Bias is an inclination of temperament or outlook to present or hold a partial perspective at the expense of (possibly equally valid) alternatives in reference to objects, people, or groups. Anything biased generally is one-sided and therefore lacks a neutral point of view. Bias can come in many forms and is often considered to be synonymous withprejudice or bigotry.-Wikipedia

Media bias is the bias of journalists and news producers within the mass media, in the selection of which events and stories are reported and how they are covered. The term “media bias” implies a pervasive or widespread bias contravening the standards of journalism, rather than the perspective of an individual journalist or article. The direction and degree of media bias in various countries is widely disputed.

Practical limitations to media neutrality include the inability of journalists to report all available stories and facts, and the requirement that selected facts be linked into a coherent narrative (Newton 1989). Since it is impossible to report everything, selectivity is inevitable. Government influence, including overt and covert censorship, biases the media in some countries. Market forces that result in a biased presentation include the ownership of the news source, concentration of media ownership, the selection of staff, the preferences of an intended audience, and pressure from advertisers.

Political bias has been a feature of the mass media since its birth with the invention of the printing press. The expense of early printing equipment restricted media production to a limited number of people. Historians have found that publishers often served the interests of powerful social groups.[2]–Wikipedia

 

 

Black, White, Other

black white other

Good Evening World Wide Web!  Today is the greatest day!  We are closer to perfection than we were yesterday!  I’m going to begin by saying, “Happy Groundhog Day!”  Punxsutanwney Phil didn’t see his shadow.  Pennsylvania’s most famous groundhog has forecast an early spring.  Ok..so for anyone unfamiliar, there is a legend in the United States that if this furry rodent, or groundhog sees his shadow in a place called Gobblers Knob in Pennsylvania, winter will last 6 more weeks.  If he doesn’t then spring will come earlier.  There’s a ceremony and all conducted by the “Inner Circle.”  Well today, cameras rolling, and no shadow.  My flowers are ready!  I come offering a great read.  The book “Black, White, Other” has gotten some good reviews.    Enjoy!

 

“Some OTHER RACE”

Census2010HispanicRace2-252x300

 

Great Evening World Wide Web.  Today is a great day!  We are all closer to perfection than we were yesterday.   As I searched the internet to find the real measure of how our Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census tracks our human population, I wanted to make sure that I could offer an actual example.  I want to begin by drawing your attention to question #8 that leads into #9.  This is important because Hispanics or Latinos are the nations largest minority group and growing.   I realize how important it may be to keep up with these growing statistics, but most people don’t.  I’ve heard, well, I’m not “Black” I’m African-American or vice versa.   There are Latinos who don’t know their race or races, if you ask them “What is your race?” They will proudly tell you Latino.  As I’ve reiterated, this is a cultural classification.  The problem is, MOST Latinos are “Mixed” or OTHER.  I would go as far as to say PLENTY of African-Americans or Blacks are also, but because of the history of this country, that dialogue is far off.    The thought processes behind the ideals that created and maintained the idea of racial segregation is why the Ethnicities are skewing the stats.  Here’s how I would answer these questions.   My children would check the box that say “OTHER” Latino origin,  Black, and American Indian.  That’s three boxes!!!  Alternatively, I may just CHECK THE BOX that says “SOME OTHER RACE” attempting to show my children are a mixture. A New Creation. Then I could attempt to explain by saying something like BLACK and LATINO or Blaxureno.  That’s a real head scratcher.  The problem with that answer is that one is a RACE and the OTHER is a culture.  My children are CULTURALLY AMERICAN.  I am an American, my mother, grandmother, and great-grandmother on both maternal and paternal sides were all born right here in America.  I married an immigrant, in the land of immigrants.  This is a growing dynamic in America.   Is melanin the issue? Precious cancer fighting, sun protecting melanin. (another blog)  What a way to skew some stats!  This is a sensitive yet important issue that we must work on….together.  This is a small lesson on how items are offered through our government.  You see, the results of these federal forms are used to decide civil rights laws, funding, & even redistricting of congressional districts.  Is it the form’s problem or do we need to add more boxes?  Will it stop the mixtures?  I really don’t think so unless we enact some older laws from the 1960s and 70s.   The problem is who I’m trying to tell you I am doesn’t fit our typical understanding anymore.   For this very reason the US Census Bureau is working to change some of the questions that we now use to track our current racial demographics.  Read more at the link below.

http://www.pewsocialtrends.org/2012/08/07/census-bureau-considers-changing-its-racehispanic-questions/

Is the answer to add more questions?  Is it just LATINOS who check other?  What about the people who prefer one racial name for a classification over another?  Could it be that PEOPLE have changed and don’t fit into our BLACK, WHITE, ASIAN rules?  Science says this is the base of all ethnicities and race.  Could it be race is completely evolving?  The “concept” that doesn’t exist, but we’ve all come to understand as our realities around the globe?  What do you think?  I would love to hear from you.  Share any comments or answers to these questions that you’d like.

As always, I appreciate your time.  I’d like to thank you for stopping by.  Please show your support by finding my Facebook and Twitter page @wecheckother.  LIKE the page to show your support.  I’m always looking for guest bloggers and people willing to share their stories.  Please contact me at wecheckother@yahoo.com.  Until the Next!

XOXOXO,

Others’Mother

BLACK, LATINO & “OTHER”

Good Afternoon World Wide Web!  Today is a great day!  We are closer to perfection than we were yesterday.  Indeed we are.  I want to begin by sharing a personal, true story.  This story is one of many that began to give shape to a reality that I truly lived and learned something that before this milestone I really didn’t understand the dynamics of its reality.  It took place about 5 years ago.  This is based on a real life event so I will skew names just to protect the persons involved.  After the birth of my daughter; I’ll call my daughter Kaitlyn. I was invited to a then long time friend of mine’s house who is Dominican.  For anyone not familiar I will place some definitions in this post to give you as much of a visual as possible.  Let me begin by saying that I am not trying to attack Dominican culture, I am only trying to bring awareness and speaking from a true personal experience.

I entered the gathering with my daughter “Kaitlyn in hand.  The music and food were awesome!  There was great reception among the people who knew that I identify as African-American and there were some who weren’t as open; which was o.k.  After about an hour or so of being there, I was comfronted by a woman, who identified as Dominican.  She asked me, “Who’s baby is that, that you have?”  I smiled and said, “This is my daughter Kaitlyn.”  The woman, I’ll call her Emma gasped,  “hhhhuuuuhhhh!”  She almost scared me.  “De verdad!” She replied to me in spanish.  This means, “For real?”  I replied,” yes she is.”   I looked at Emma almost confused because she knew very well that my husband was Mestizo and from Central America.  The disbelief was the beginning of my awareness.  I tried to soften the blow by beginning to mention my husband.  Emma says, “You still with the Mexican?”  I told her, “Well yes, but my husband is from Honduras”   Emma continues to dig the hole, “Well Mexico, Honduras; they’re the same thing!”  I gave a blank stare.  Emma; “Well how is it that your daughter looks like that?”  I reply to Emma, “What do you mean?”  She goes on to talk about her two daughters and how her grandmother was “white” and her husband’s grandmother had long hair like another guest.  I replied, “Well that’s nice.”  I have to admit, it took me a few moments for the light to turn on but then I realized, that after her series of questions, she really identified me in her mind as though my family had migrated from Africa yesterday.  I honestly looked at her, before becoming more mature and thought, “She’s “blacker” than me.”  What I’m saying is that Emma’s skin was much darker than mine.  If she didn’t open her mouth and speak Spanish I would consider her just another “black” woman.   I have to give you a visual so that you can better understand.  You see, Emma and her husband were Afro-Dominican.

Afro – Dominican is a Dominican of African descent. Most Africans arrived to the Dominican Republic came to this land from the sixteenth to the nineteenth century because of slavery. Most of them came from West and Central Africa. Currently there are also many black immigrants, particularly Haitians, which can be included within of the Afro-Dominican community, if they were born in the country or have Dominican naturalization. Afro-Dominicans are the majority in the country, being mainly mulattos. -Wikipedia

Emma and her family had beautiful rich melanin content, and her hair texture was what I would identify immediately as a “black” or “African-American” woman, and so was her husband and daughters.  My heritage is also pretty interesting, but I didn’t feel the need or thought it would be useful to go down my entire lineage so that she could understand my racial dynamics.  I thought, “Is she really asking me this?”  As I looked around the room I saw every “race” and mixture under the rainbow.  I got a crash course in that visit of the racial dynamics within the “LATINO community.  They also have a very common acceptance of “Other” or “mixed” children, because this was their reality.  “Other” or “mixed” children to them are typical to be Latino.  Just as long as the children came from 2 people who identified as Latino.  It is very similar if not worse to that of American culture, in my opinion.    I even mentioned the incident to my husband who wasn’t there with me and he said, “All Dominican’s are “black.”  Even my husband, whose appearance is that of a typical LATINO; “Indian” or “Mestizo” carried some similar racial bias.

I have to admit, I’ve heard the “she looks hispanic” or “she has indian in her blood” and the long list of others to try to explain race and cultural relations.  What I found in that visit was an unwillingness from a racially black, culturally Latino women-Emma that my Kaitlyn who has a typical look and mixture of a “mulatto” from her own country, simply because I identify was “African-American.”  This is also one of the long list of occurences that birthed in my heart the need for my children and others like mine to have their own identities and not be shoved in or out of a culture or race for an unwillingness to accept their uniqueness and symbolism of unity.

I imagine that this takes place in MOST ETHNICITIES.  Mainly because an ETHNICITY is not a RACE.  It just a group of RACES or RACIAL MIXTURES that celebrate a CULTURE.  I’ve included some definitions for anyone from the eastern hemispehere or just not particularly familiar with the countries I’m mentioning.

 

Dominicans (Spanish: Dominicanos) are people inhabiting or originating from Dominican Republic. The majority of Dominicans reside in Dominican Republic, although there is also a large Dominican diaspora, especially in the United States, Puerto Rico and Spain. The population of the Dominican Republic in 2007 was estimated by the United Nations at 9,760,000.[2]—                 -Wikipeidia

Racial issues

As elsewhere in the Spanish Empire, the Spanish colony of Hispaniola employed a social system known as casta, wherein Peninsulares (Spaniards born in Spain) occupied the highest echelon. These were followed, in descending order of status, by: criollos, castizos, mestizos, Indians, mulattoes, zambos, and black slaves.[9][10] The stigma of this stratification persisted, reaching its culmination in the Trujillo regime, as the dictator used racial persecution and nationalistic fervor against Haitians.

According to a study by the CUNY Dominican Studies Institute, about 90% of the contemporary Dominican population has West African ancestry to varying degrees.[11] However, most Dominicans do not self-identify as black, in contrast to people of West African ancestry in other countries. A variety of terms are used to represent a range of skintones, such as morena (brown), canela (red/brown; literally: “cinnamon”), India (Indian), blanca oscura (dark white), and trigueña (literally “wheat colored”, which is the English equivalent of olive skin),[12] among others.

Many have claimed that this represents a reluctance to self-identify with West African descent and the culture of the freed slaves. According to Dr. Miguel Anibal Perdomo, professor of Dominican Identity and Literature at Hunter College in New York City, “There was a sense of ‘deculturación’ among the West Indian slaves of Hispaniola. [There was] an attempt to erase any vestiges of West Indian culture from the Dominican Republic. We were, in some way, brainwashed and we’ve become westernized.”[13]

However, this view is not universal, as many also claim that Dominican culture is simply different and rejects the racial categorizations of other regions. Ramona Hernández, director of the Dominican Studies Institute at City College of New York asserts that the terms were originally a defense against racism: “During the Trujillo regime, people who were dark skinned were rejected, so they created their own mechanism to fight it.” She went on to explain, “When you ask, ‘What are you?’ they don’t give you the answer you want … saying we don’t want to deal with our blackness is simply what you want to hear.”[14] The Dominican Republic is not unique in this respect, either. In a 1976 census survey conducted in Brazil, respondents described their skin color in 136 distinct terms.[9][14]

-Wikipedia

As always, I sincerely appreciate your time and attendance.  If you can identify, live in, or love someone who checks “OTHER” or is outside of 1 box, please show your support my liking @wecheckother on facebook and twitter.   Thank you!  Until the next.

XOXOXO,

OthersMother

 

I’ll Create My Own Identity!

enterlove

Great Evening World Wide Web!  Today is a wonderful day.  We are closer to perfection today than we were yesterday.  On this very first Sunday in 2013 I want to blog about a subject that I think most people who are of multiple races, ethnicities & cultures have heard.  I wouldn’t say it’s right or wrong.  I think personally that it is all about the “user” and how comfortable they feel in creating their own personal identity.  I’m sure there are many feelings on how this subject should be approached.   I think all identity is personal even if you identify with a singular box.  I realize that it really doesn’t begin to touch the issues that so many of the people who are “mixed” heritiage or couples in interracial or intercultural relationships have to deal with, but again these are a personal choice.    We’ve all heard these terms or similar ones: blaxican, blasian, blatino, blacknamese, blacklaos, blackapino, Caurean, Casian, ChexMex, Chigro, Filitina, Japorican, Mexipino, and the list goes on and on.  The attempt to find a box for a child of direct “mixed” heritage, where a new name is created.   Could you imagine a census with soooo many choices?  I think the boxes would be the entire questionnaire.  I’m not trying in any way to make light of the subject, but I am trying to make a point.  Maybe there will never be a way to identify all the beautiful uniqueness that humanity has created.  I do think however that the simple box OTHER will began to let that light shine.  I know that OTHER is one box, but it’s the hippest, most inclusive, colorful box in the list.   Atleast that’s what I tell my two beautiful kids.  They have friends and loved ones who identify with just one and have pride in one.  My 5 year old has even began to be pitched into why she is just “one” race based on her melanin content.  (That’s another blog)   It simply means that you have the priviledge to explain instead of just robotically checking a box.  It’s kinking the “norm” to the curb, and redifining the integrations of LOVE and the beginning of understanding what is unique.  OTHER!  WE CHEK OTHER.  If you hadn’t become fully aqauinted with the idea of wecheckother.com,  I really hope this begins to explain why this blog is here.  I’m excited to hear from you and look forward to learning together.  Let me know what you think.  How should “mixed” race, culture and ethnicities identify themselves?  Until til the next.

XOXOXO,

Others’Mother